Quick Navigation

Creatinine

Creatinine is a metabolic byproduct of creatine, and is sometimes used as a biomarker for kidney damage as it can accumulate when kidneys are impaired (despite creatine supplementation giving a false positive).

Our evidence-based analysis on creatinine features 24 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by .
Reviewed by
Examine.com Team
Last Updated:

Get the latest information on 400+ supplements and their effects on 500+ health outcomes.

By becoming an Examine Plus member, you'll have access to all of the latest nutrition research. Quickly and easy look up evidence on over 400 supplements across over 500 different health goals, outcomes, conditions, and more.

Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect creatinine.
Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Supplement Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-a Notable Moderate See all 12 studies
Creatine supplementation usually increases serum creatinine levels during the loading phase (but usually not during maintenance), since creatinine is the breakdown product of creatine. This is not indicative of kidney damage.
grade-b - Very High See all 3 studies
No known influence on creatinine, a biomarker for kidney health.
grade-c Minor - See study
An increase in creatinine has been noted alongside weight loss; practical significance of this information is not known.

Become an Examine Plus member to view this information.

You can currently view 3 supplements as a non-member - becoming a member will give you access to 26 total supplements on creatinine.

Already a member? Login now to access.

grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-c  
grade-d  
grade-d  
grade-d  
grade-d  
grade-d  
grade-d  

Get access to the latest nutrition research

By becoming an Examine Plus member, you'll have access to all of the latest nutrition research on over 300 supplements across over 500 different health goals, outcomes, conditions, and more.

Frequently Asked Questions and Articles on Creatinine

Is creatine safe for your kidneys?
In people with healthy kidneys, long-term creatine supplementation is safe, but there are no long-term creatine studies in people with kidney issues. For these people, using a low dose of creatine (if any) would be prudent.
Click here to see all 24 references.