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Cardiovascular

Affects cardiovascular disease risk or treatment through interactions with the heart, blood vessels, or blood itself.

Our evidence-based analysis on cardiovascular features 217 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by and reviewed by the Examine team.
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References

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