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Cardiovascular

Affects cardiovascular disease risk or treatment through interactions with the heart, blood vessels, or blood itself.

Our evidence-based analysis on cardiovascular features 61 unique references to scientific papers.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Cardiovascular

Are eggs healthy?
Eggs can be considered healthy. They can have downsides depending how many you consume and your state of health, but in general they are safe to consume.
The (mild) health risks of energy drinks
Energy drinks can make a small, potentially negative impact in certain metabolic measures in young, relatively healthy people. But do these changes really matter?
How can I best ensure cardiovascular health and longevity?

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References

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