Quick Navigation

Potatoes

Potatoes are starchy tubers that contain a modest amount of complete protein and a broad array of vitamins and minerals. When eaten boiled or baked without calorie-dense toppings, they are among the most filling foods per calorie, but when fried they are less filling and are associated with an elevated risk of weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in observational studies.

Our evidence-based analysis on potatoes features 5 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by and reviewed by the Examine team.
Last Updated:

Summary of Potatoes

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Potatoes

Percent of daily value per 100 calories
Baked potato with skinWhole wheat breadWhite bread (enriched)
Fiber
9.4%
10.9%
3.8%
Potassium
16.5%
2.8%
1.1%
Magnesium
7.6%
8.5%
2.3%
Calcium
1.4%
4.5%
5.6%
Iron
6.5%
5.3%
7.9%
Vitamin A
0.4%
0%
0%
Vitamin E
0.4%
1.2%
0.4%
Vitamin C
17.3%
0%
0%

💊 Get unbiased supplement information


Easily stay on top of the latest nutrition research

Become an Examine Member to get access to the latest research. Get 150+ studies summarized for you across 25 different categories every month.

Members also have access to the Examine Study Database of 400+ supplements and their effects on 600+ health outcomes, as well as in-depth research analyses. Understand the whole body of nutrition and supplement evidence at a glance.

Get instant access — start your free 14-day trial

Already a Member? Click here to log in.


Human Effect Matrix

Unlocked for Examine Members

Easily stay on top of the latest nutrition research

Become an Examine Member to get access to the latest research. Get 150+ studies summarized for you across 25 different categories every month.

Members also have access to the Examine Study Database of 400+ supplements and their effects on 600+ health outcomes, as well as in-depth research analyses. Understand the whole body of nutrition and supplement evidence at a glance.

Get instant access — start your free 14-day trial

Already a Member? Click here to log in.


The Human Effect Matrix summarizes human studies to tell you what effects Potatoes has on your body, how much evidence there is, and how strong these effects are.

Full details are available to Examine Members. Not a Member? Try Examine Membership completely free for two weeks.
Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-d Minor Moderate See 2 studies
One trial found a possible reduction in systolic BP from eating potatoes in people with pre-hypertension or hypertension, another trial saw no effect on BP among people with normal BP.
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
Studies do not currently suggest potato-based foods are uniquely fattening, nor do they clearly lead to fat loss.
grade-d - - See study
One trial found potatoes did not affect CRP levels compared to eating refined grains.
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
Two trials found no effect of potato-based foods on fasting glucose levels.
grade-d - - See study
One trial found eating French fries for 30 days did not change HbA1c levels compared to eating almonds.
grade-d - Very High See all 3 studies
Three trials found no effect of potato-based foods on HDL levels compared to other foods (cashews, refined grains, hazelnuts, chocolate).
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
Two trials found no effect of potato-based foods on HOMA-IR.
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
Two trials found no effect of potato-based foods on fasting insulin, although one trial found higher postprandial insulin after eating French fries compared to eating almonds.
grade-d - High See all 3 studies
By and large, potato-based foods haven't been shown to affect LDL-C levels, although one trial found LDL-C levels were lower with cashews compared to low-fat potato chips
grade-d - - See study
grade-d - High See all 3 studies
2 trials found no effect of potatoes on total cholesterol compared to control foods and one trial found cashews lowered total cholesterol compared to low-fat potato chips.
grade-d - High See all 3 studies
Several trials found no effect of potatoes on triglyceride levels compared to a variety of other foods (refined grains, hazelnuts, chocolate, cashews).
grade-d - High See all 3 studies
Mixed evidence as to whether potatoes alter body weight. Two trials found potato-based foods had no effect on body weight, while one trial found French fries without (but not with) added spices reduced body weight compared to almonds.

Stay on top of the latest research

To unlock the full archives of our Study Database and research analyses, become an Examine Member today.

Start your 14-day free trial

Click here to see all 5 references.