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Sarcosine

Sarcosine is a product of glycine. It can be used as a cognitive enhancer and to treat schizophrenia.

Our evidence-based analysis on sarcosine features 76 unique references to scientific papers.

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Summary of Sarcosine

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Sarcosine, also known as N-methylglycine, is a metabolite of glycine. It shares properties with both glycine and D-serine, though its effects are weaker.

Sarcosine supplementation can be used to alleviate symptoms of depression and schizophrenia, or improve cognition. It is absorbed more reliably by the body than D-serine, which can also treat similar conditions.

Sarcosine is being investigated for its connection to prostate cancer. It may be a biomarker for prostate cancer, which means that if sarcosine levels in the blood are higher than normal, it could be an indicator of prostate cancer. This doesn’t mean that sarcosine itself causes cancer. More research is needed to confirm this relationship.

Sarcosine’s main mechanism involves inhibiting a transporter, called GlyT1, which takes up glycine and D-serine into cells. This increases the levels of glycine and D-serine in the body and increases their effects.

It is unknown at this time if sarcosine supplementation is harmful. It may act as a co-carcinogen, meaning it doesn’t cause cancer, but increases the effects of other cancer-causing compounds.

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How to Take

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

The standard sarcosine dose is 30mg/kg of bodyweight, which correlates to an approximate dosage range of 2,045 – 2,727mg for people between 150 – 200 lbs.

Sarcosine is taken daily.

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Human Effect Matrix

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The Human Effect Matrix summarizes human studies to tell you what effects Sarcosine has on your body, how much evidence there is, and how strong these effects are.

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Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-b Notable High See all 4 studies
While the magnitude of benefit seen with Sarcosine is comparable to both D-serine and glycine, it appears to require a much lower (more practical) dose than does glycine and is more reliable than D-serine
grade-c - - See 2 studies

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Things to Note

Primary Function:

Also Known As

N-methylgycine, Methylglycine

Do Not Confuse With

Glycine or D-Serine (all related but different molecules)

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Click here to see all 76 references.