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Protein or peptide

A powder, usually flavored, that is consumed for the purpose of adding dietary protein to the diet when food is not consumed. Typically seen as a food product or a meal replacement, protein powders come from a variety of sources such as milk, beef, rice, pea, or hemp.

Our evidence-based analysis on protein or peptide features 162 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel .
Reviewed by
Examine.com Team
Last Updated:

Protein or peptide Summary

Protein supplements are typically used in conjunction with a proper diet (or as a band-aid to a subpar diet) to increase dietary protein intake.

Some specific types of protein are made for certain scenarios, such as casein protein for a slow-release protein and whey protein for a faster release.

They differ from Amino Acid Supplement as protein supplements will be a non-specific assortment of amino acids in large amounts, whereas Amino Acid supplementation is in lower doses, in isolation, and for specific purposes.

Protein powders can be from either animal sources or plant sources, it is generally advised for vegans and vegetarians to consider protein supplementation due to the chance that their diet may be subpar.

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Things To Know & Note

Also Known As

Protein powder, dehydrated protein, protein, Protein supplements, protein supplement

Do Not Confuse With

Amino acid supplements

Frequently Asked Questions about Protein or peptide

How can you assess protein quality?
Several scales have been developed to rate proteins according to their respective bioavailabilities and, more recently, amino acid profiles. Those scales can help guide your choice of protein, as long as you understand their premises and limitations.
5 little-known facts about protein
Can you survive if you eat only protein? Can you survive without eating protein? How does your body keep functioning when you fast? Do high-protein diets actually promote weight loss, or do they only help you retain muscle when you eat below maintenance? Find the answers to those questions, and more, in the article below.
How much protein do you need per day?
How much daily protein you need depends on your weight, goal, and level of physical activity: from 1.2 g/kg if you’re sedentary all the way up to 3.3 g/kg if you’re trying to minimize fat gain while bulking.

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Research Breakdown on Protein or peptide

Popular forms of Protein Supplements:

Examine.com has a list of evidence-based muscle building supplements.

References

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