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Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a blend of nutrients commonly used a spice. It can help regulate glucose metabolism in diabetic people, but may also possess some toxic components.

Our evidence-based analysis on cinnamon features 27 unique references to scientific papers.

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Summary of Cinnamon

Primary Information, Benefits, Effects, and Important Facts

Cinnamon is popular spice worldwide. It exerts numerous biological effects on the body.

Cinnamon is frequently treated as an anti-diabetic compound, since it reduces the rate at which glucose enters the body. Not only does it help diabetics avoid blood sugar spikes, but it also improves glucose use in the cell itself.

Over time, cinnamon can reduce fasting blood glucose, and potentially cholesterol levels as well.

Cinnamon does not need to be purchased specifically as a supplement, and can be found in grocery stores. It does contain a liver toxin called coumarin, which can be harmful in high doses. Making cinnamon tea can reduce the risk of coumarin poisoning, since the toxin is left behind in the leftover sediment. Ceylon cinnamon, which is dervied from a different plant species, has lower levels of coumarin, which makes it a better supplement option.

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How to Take

Medical Disclaimer

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

The standard dose for anti-diabetic purposes is 1-6g of cinnamon daily, taken with carbohydrate containing meals.

Ceylon cinnamon is always a better supplemental option than cassia cinnamon, due to the lower coumarin content.

Things to Note

Is a Form Of

Primary Function:

Also Known As

Chinese (Saigon) cinnamon, Cassia Cinnamon, Indonesian (Ceylon/True) Cinnamon

Caution Notice

Using Cassia cinnamon can expose one to dangerously high levels of the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic phytochemical 'Coumarin' when superloaded, thus if superloading cinnamon Ceylon should always be used.

Cinnamon is non-stimulatory

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Click here to see all 27 references.