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Pyritinol

Pyritinol (Pyrithioxine) is a molecule that is, structurally, two Vitamin B6 molecules attached to each other. It is touted to be an anti-hangover pill and a brain booster, with subpar evidence for both claims; it is linked to a moderate amount of avoidable side-effects.

Our evidence-based analysis on pyritinol features 27 unique references to scientific papers.

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Summary of Pyritinol

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Pyritinol (also known as pyrithioxine) is a compound with is essentially two Vitamin B6 molecules bound together by two sulfur atoms (a disulfide bridge). It has historically been used in European countries for treatment of Dementia and related issues of cognitive decline in the elderly. It is marketed under the brand name Encephabol.

It has had a resurgence as a nootropic compound for recreational use, but no studies have been undertaken in a young adult population.

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How to Take

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

A standard dosage of pyritinol used is 600mg taken in divided doses throughout the day with meals, usually 300mg taken with two meals of the day.

Things to Note

Is a Form Of

Also Known As

Pyrithioxine, Encephabol (Brand Name)

Do Not Confuse With

Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6)

  • Pyritinol is semi-water soluble. It does not need to be taken with food, although it may help

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Click here to see all 27 references.