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Molybdenum

Molybdenum is an essential mineral. It is vital for the function of several enzymes, but is easily obtained through the diet. Molybdenum deficiencies are virtually unheard of, and there are no benefits to high doses, making supplementation unnecessary.

Our evidence-based analysis on molybdenum features 37 unique references to scientific papers.

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Summary of Molybdenum

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Molybdenum is an essential mineral. The human body requires very low quantities of molybdenum to support three groups of enzymes.

Molybdenum deficiencies are extremely rare, since molybdenum is easily available through the diet, as it is found in grains and water. The body easily retains molybdenum, and only needs a few micrograms.

Molybdenum functions as a cofactor for three groups of enzymes, meaning it is needed for the enzymes to do their job. It is incorporated into a molecule called molybdopterin, which forms the actual cofactor. A molybdenum deficiency would impair the functions of these enzymes, which would prevent the body from processing amino acids that contain sulfur. Molybdenum deficiencies are characterized by symptoms similar to sulfur toxicity.

Molybdenum supplementation is unnecessary. Due to the lack of evidence and very low risk of deficiency, molybdenum may not even need to be added to multivitamin formulas.

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How to Take

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

Molybdenum supplementation is not recommended because there is no evidence to support any benefits from supplementation, deficiencies are extremely rare, and molybdenum is easily obtained through the diet.

More research is needed to determine if long-term supplementation is safe. For this reason, molybdenum doses should not exceed 50µg (0.05mg).

Click here to see all 37 references.