Vitamin D can reduce a marker of inflammation in postmenopausal women Original paper

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, supplementation with vitamin D reduced the levels of one biomarker of inflammation in postmenopausal women.

This Study Summary was published on March 27, 2024.

Quick Summary

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, supplementation with vitamin D reduced the levels of one biomarker of inflammation in postmenopausal women.

What was studied?

The effect of supplementation with vitamin D on the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP; an inflammatory biomarker) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the context of postmenopause.

Who was studied?

A total of 999 postmenopausal women (average ages of 58–65; average baseline serum vitamin D levels of 12.1–24.8 ng/mL).

How was it studied?

A meta-analysis of 7 randomized controlled trials was performed. Two trials were conducted in the United States and 1 trial each was conducted in the United Kingdom, Thailand, Brazil, Denmark, and Iran. Six trials administered vitamin D3 daily, with the dose ranging from 400 international units (IU) to 2,800 IU, whereas 1 trial administered 40,000 IU of vitamin D2 weekly. The intervention duration ranged from 12 weeks to 1 year.

What were the results?

Supplementation with vitamin D reduced (improved) the levels of CRP to a small degree but had no effect on blood pressure.

The risk of bias was low in 6 trials and unclear in 1 trial.

This Study Summary was published on March 27, 2024.