Greater variety of fruits and vegetables linked to lower all-cause mortality risk Original paper

In this meta-analysis of 12 observational studies, consuming a greater variety of fruits and vegetables was associated with a lower risk of mortality from all causes. However, the certainty of the evidence was very low.

This Study Summary was published on February 5, 2024.

Quick Summary

In this meta-analysis of 12 observational studies, consuming a greater variety of fruits and vegetables was associated with a lower risk of mortality from all causes. However, the certainty of the evidence was very low.

What was studied?

The primary aim was to study the association between the variety of fruit and vegetable consumption and the following outcomes:

The secondary aim was to study the association between the variety of fruit and vegetable consumption and the incidence of CVD risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, and poor glycemic control.

Who was studied?

A total of 299,183 men and women (average ages of 39–87 at baseline).

How was it studied?

A meta-analysis of 12 observational studies (7 prospective cohort studies and 5 cross-sectional studies) was performed. Six of the studies were conducted in the United States, and 1 study each was conducted in China, Iran, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

In most of the studies, dietary intake was assessed using food frequency questionnaires. Fruit and vegetable variety was defined as the number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed.

The duration of the cohort studies ranged from 1 to 24 years.

What were the results?

Compared with the lowest category of fruit and vegetable variety consumption, the highest category was associated with an 11% lower risk of death from all causes.

The certainty of the evidence was rated very low for all of the primary outcomes and low/very low for the secondary outcomes.

This Study Summary was published on February 5, 2024.