Pelvic physiotherapy may improve stress urinary incontinence Original paper

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, pelvic floor muscle training improved some clinical symptoms of stress urinary incontinence.

This Study Summary was published on February 8, 2024.

Quick Summary

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, pelvic floor muscle training improved some clinical symptoms of stress urinary incontinence.

What was studied?

The effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on clinical symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Specifically, the following outcomes were examined:

  • Urinary incontinence severity assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire–Short Form (ICIQ-SF) and the pad test
  • Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function assessed using the Oxford Scale and manometry
  • Urinary incontinence improvement

Who was studied?

A total of 1,225 women (average ages of 22 to 74) with SUI.

How was it studied?

A meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials was performed. Four trials were conducted in Brazil, 2 were conducted in Japan, and 1 trial each was conducted in Oman, Sweden, the United States, South Korea, Iran, China, Canada, Portugal, Poland, and Turkey. PFMT was administered alone or in combination with other treatments (including education, biofeedback, and electrical stimulation). The intervention was compared to no intervention, bladder training, advice and/or educational material, and other active treatments. The intervention duration ranged from 1 to 16 weeks.

What were the results?

PFMT reduced the severity of urinary incontinence assessed using the ICIQ-SF and increased PFM function assessed using both the Oxford Scale and manometry. It also led to greater rates of improvement in urinary incontinence. However, the certainty of evidence was rated as very low for all outcomes.

This Study Summary was published on February 8, 2024.