The role of cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic low back pain Original paper

In this meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials, cognitive behavioral therapy improved social engagement capacity in the short term in adults with chronic low back pain.

This Study Summary was published on February 2, 2024.

Quick Summary

In this meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials, cognitive behavioral therapy improved social engagement capacity in the short term in adults with chronic low back pain.

What was studied?

The primary outcome was the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on social engagement capacity in the context of chronic low back pain.

The secondary outcomes were symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Who was studied?

A total of 2,527 men and women (average ages of 40–63) with chronic low back pain for more than 6 months.

How was it studied?

A meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials was performed. In all of the trials but one, CBT was administered in person (individually, in groups, or both individually and in groups). In most of the trials, CBT was administered by psychologists, physiotherapists, or general practitioners. The comparators included no intervention, usual care, and other active treatments. The intervention duration ranged from 3 to 32 weeks, with a total contact time of 2 to 138 hours.

What were the results?

CBT improved social engagement capacity at the end of the intervention, but not at the 6-month follow-up. CBT had no effect on symptoms of depression or anxiety.

The risk of bias was low in 1 trial and high in 15 of the trials.

Anything else I need to know?

The poor methodological quality of the trials included in the meta-analysis reduces our confidence in the findings.

This Study Summary was published on February 2, 2024.