Cognitive behavioral therapy may improve lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Original paper

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, cognitive behavioral therapy improved lung function and health-related quality of life among participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although the quality of evidence was not high.

This Study Summary was published on February 12, 2024.

Quick Summary

In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, cognitive behavioral therapy improved lung function and health-related quality of life among participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although the quality of evidence was not high.

What was studied?

The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)* on lung function, quality of life, anxiety, and depression among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The lung function outcomes included forcefully exhaled volume during 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and the ratio of FEV1/FVC.

Other outcomes included quality of life and health-related quality of life, assessed using the World Health Organization's Abbreviated Quality of Life Instrument and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, respectively. Anxiety symptoms and depression symptoms were assessed using the Self-rating Anxiety Scale and Self-rating Depression Scale.

Who was studied?

1,887 adults (ages 50–80) with COPD.

How was it studied?

This meta-analysis included data from 16 randomized controlled trials that compared the effects of CBT to standard care. The durations ranged from 2 to 24 weeks, with an average duration of 8 weeks.

The CBT interventions were most commonly administered by a doctor or nurse in a face-to-face setting, although web-based, group, and psychiatrist-administered programs were also included.

What were the results?

Lung function improved with CBT in comparison to standard care. All measures of lung function were improved, but mostly with low quality of evidence and high heterogeneity.

Quality of life and health-related quality of life were improved with CBT in comparison with control groups, and anxiety and depression symptoms were reduced. Heterogeneity was high in all outcomes, with the exception of quality of life.

Anything else I need to know?

Some caution is appropriate when interpreting these findings. The certainty of evidence for all outcomes was moderate or low, and indications of publication biaswere noted.

*CBT interventions have been found to reduce anxiety and depression among people with COPD. CBT might improve lung function through behavioral change and/or improving treatment adherence.[1]

This Study Summary was published on February 12, 2024.

References

  1. ^Yohannes AM, Murri MB, Hanania NA, Regan EA, Iyer A, Bhatt SP, Kim V, Kinney GL, Wise RA, Eakin MN, Hoth KF,Depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with COPD: A network analysis.Respir Med.(2022-Jul)