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Weight

Your weight is the result of your body’s fight against gravity. The ideal weight-loss diet will maximize fat loss and minimize fat-free mass loss.

Our evidence-based analysis on weight features 232 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by and reviewed by the Examine team.
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References

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