Testosterone

The manly man hormone, testosterone is the most well known androgen that mediates androgenic processes such as muscle building, fat loss, some aspects of cognition and hair loss in some persons; important in puberty, it is sought after for its muscle building potential in men.

Our evidence based analysis features 176 unique references to scientific papers.


Research analysis by and verified by the Examine.com Research Team. Last updated on Apr 27, 2018.

Summary of Testosterone

Primary Information, Benefits, Effects, and Important Facts

If you are looking for an actual stack of supplements to take, we recommend you look at our increasing testosterone stack.

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions and answers regarding Testosterone

Q: What is 'roid rage'?

A: Mostly a myth; testosterone (including injections) can increase impulsivity in some but this does not appear to be reliable (does not affect every person tested), impulsivity might lead to aggression but this is drawing at straws now with the connections

Read full answer to "What is 'roid rage'?"


Q: How can you increase testosterone naturally?

A: Quality sleep, physical activity, and weight management come first. A few supplements can help sustain healthy testosterone levels, but most supplements marketed as testosterone boosters don’t work, though some can make you believe they do by boosting your libido.

Read full answer to "How can you increase testosterone naturally?"


Q: Do herbal aphrodisiacs work?

A: It depends on the product touted to be an aprhodisiac, but some of them do apparently increase sexual desire; it is a relatively underresearched topic though, and we don't know why they increase sexuality

Read full answer to "Do herbal aphrodisiacs work?"


Q: Four Testosterone Boosters and Sketchy Research

Read full answer to "Four Testosterone Boosters and Sketchy Research"


Q: Does ashwagandha increase testosterone?

A: Ashwagandha, an herb from traditional Indian medicine, has a bit of evidence for increasing testosterone but it is not overly convincing at this time.

Read full answer to "Does ashwagandha increase testosterone?"


Q: Does ejaculation affect testosterone levels?

A: Ejaculation results in changes in prolactin (increase) and dopamine (temporary decrease), but does not result in changes in testosterone. Although prolactin and dopamine are both involved with testosterone, they do not appear to influence testosterone levels acutely.

Read full answer to "Does ejaculation affect testosterone levels?"


Q: Is semen high in protein?

A: Yes. Semen is 50% protein by weight and contains a variety of nutrients to protect the sperm cells from damages.

Read full answer to "Is semen high in protein?"


Q: Does creatine cause hair loss?

A: It’s plausible, but unlikely. One RCT linked creatine supplementation to an increase in DHT — an androgen involved in hair loss — but this RCT has never been replicated.

Read full answer to "Does creatine cause hair loss?"


Q: How important is sleep?

A: Sleep is incredibly important, and can be considered crucial alongside diet and exercise. Proper sleep habits help sustain many biological processes, and bad sleep can cause these processes to be suboptimal or even malfunction.

Read full answer to "How important is sleep?"


Q: Can creatine increase your testosterone levels?

A: There is no convincing evidence that creatine can increase your testosterone levels.

Read full answer to "Can creatine increase your testosterone levels?"


Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect testosterone

Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
Dehydroepiandrosterone
All comparative evidence is now gathered in our ​A-to-Z Supplement Reference.
The evidence for each separate supplement is still freely available ​here.
Alcohol  
Caffeine  
Creatine  
Zinc  
Fenugreek  
HMB  
Maca  
Red Clover Extract  
Tribulus terrestris  
Velvet Antler  
Ashwagandha  
Coenzyme Q10  
Coleus forskohlii  
D-Aspartic Acid  
Licorice  
Mucuna pruriens  
Panax ginseng  
Royal Jelly  
Shilajit  
Vitamin D  
7-Keto DHEA  
Alanylglutamine  
Arachidonic acid  
Arginine  
Astaxanthin  
Beta-Alanine  
Chromium  
Chrysin  
Colostrum  
Ecdysteroids  
Eurycoma Longifolia Jack  
Fish Oil  
Gamma Oryzanol  
Ganoderma lucidum  
Garcinia cambogia  
Glutamine  
Green Tea Catechins  
L-Carnitine  
Magnesium  
Nicotine  
Phosphatidylserine  
Saffron  
Saw Palmetto  
Stinging Nettle  
Boron  
Ginger  
Calcium  
Grape Seed Extract  
Punicalagins  
Rubus coreanus  
Yohimbine  

Scientific Support & Reference Citations

Via HEM and FAQ:

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