Sleep Quality

Sleep quality refers to the restfulness of a nights sleep and how well it rejuvenates the body, and does not necessarily reflect sleep length.

Our evidence-based analysis features 95 unique references to scientific papers.


Research analysis by and verified by the Examine.com Research Team. Last updated on Apr 29, 2017.

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions and answers regarding Sleep Quality

Q: Ten tips for better sleep

A: To feel and perform your best, you don’t just need enough sleep, you need enough quality sleep. In this article, you’ll discover what you can do — and what you should avoid — to sleep well and wake up refreshed.

Read full answer to "Ten tips for better sleep"


Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect sleep quality

Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
Ginkgo biloba
All comparative evidence is now gathered in our ​A-to-Z Supplement Reference.
The evidence for each separate supplement is still freely available ​here.
Melatonin  
Valeriana officinalis  
Glycine  
Kava  
Lavender  
Magnesium  
Marijuana  
Ornithine  
Panax ginseng  
Red Clover Extract  
Sceletium tortuosum  
Theanine  
Dehydroepiandrosterone  
Echinacea  
Quercetin  
Yamabushitake  
Pyrroloquinoline quinone  
Vitex agnus castus  

Scientific Support & Reference Citations

Via HEM and FAQ:

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Cite this page

"Sleep Quality," Examine.com, published on 5 July 2013, last updated on 29 April 2017, https://examine.com/topics/sleep-quality/