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Satiety

Satiety is the process that inhibits you from eating until the next meal. Feelings of satiety may be influenced by fiber, protein, and caloric density. Satiety is sometimes confused with satiation.

Our evidence-based analysis on satiety features 11 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by and reviewed by the Examine team.
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References

  1. Dhingra D, et al. Dietary fibre in foods: a review. J Food Sci Technol. (2012)
  2. Mattes RD, Kris-Etherton PM, Foster GD. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. (2008)
  3. de Jonge L, Bray GA. The thermic effect of food and obesity: a critical review. Obes Res. (1997)
  4. Clegg ME and Cooper C. Exploring the myth: Does eating celery result in a negative energy balance?. Proc Nutr Soc. (2012)
  5. Rezaeipour M, Apanasenko GL, Nychyporuk VI. Investigating the effects of negative-calorie diet compared with low-calorie diet under exercise conditions on weight loss and lipid profile in overweight/obese middle-aged and older men. Turk J Med Sci. (2014)
  6. Holt SH, et al. A satiety index of common foods. Eur J Clin Nutr. (1995)
  7. Melanson KJ, et al. Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women. Nutrition. (2007)
  8. Monsivais P, Perrigue MM, Drewnowski A. Sugars and satiety: does the type of sweetener make a difference. Am J Clin Nutr. (2007)
  9. Soenen S, Westerterp-Plantenga MS. No differences in satiety or energy intake after high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, or milk preloads. Am J Clin Nutr. (2007)
  10. Melanson KJ, et al. High-fructose corn syrup, energy intake, and appetite regulation. Am J Clin Nutr. (2008)
  11. Stanhope KL, et al. Twenty-four-hour endocrine and metabolic profiles following consumption of high-fructose corn syrup-, sucrose-, fructose-, and glucose-sweetened beverages with meals. Am J Clin Nutr. (2008)