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Nutrition

Our evidence-based analysis on nutrition features 134 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by and reviewed by the Examine team.
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References

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  108. Cooke MB, et al. Creatine supplementation post-exercise does not enhance training-induced adaptations in middle to older aged males. Eur J Appl Physiol. (2014)
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  131. Gualano B, et al. Creatine supplementation does not impair kidney function in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. Eur J Appl Physiol. (2011)
  132. Taes YE, et al. Creatine supplementation does not decrease total plasma homocysteine in chronic hemodialysis patients. Kidney Int. (2004)
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