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Diet

Our evidence-based analysis on diet features 110 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel .
Reviewed by
Examine.com Team
Last Updated:

Frequently Asked Questions about Diet

Will eating breakfast keep you lean?
A lot of the evidence supporting the idea that eating breakfast is important for shedding pounds comes from observational studies. Do clinical trials support this claim, too?
Does aspartame cause headaches?
Is diet soda bad for you?
Research suggests that diet soda is unlikely to be detrimental to metabolic health or body composition. Further controlled trial evidence is needed to explore other possible detriments.
What should you eat for weight loss?
When it comes to figuring out what to eat for weight loss, the most important factor is eating less. When you consume less calories than you spend you will lose weight and the diet that helps you lose weight best will be the one that allows you to consume less calories without causing much distress or lethargy. The key is to pick a diet that you can adhere to.
What beneficial compounds are primarily found in animal products?
Does diet soda inhibit fat loss?
It does not inhibit fat loss at all, and may actually suppress appetite that could help fat loss (although it does not induce fat loss per se either). Diet soda, in regards to body fat, is a carbonated inert beverage
When should I take creatine?
You should take creatine at any given time - you do not need to time it, nor do you need to cycle creatine.
What beneficial compounds are primarily found in vegetables?
Lots, an obscene amount of variety depending on the vegetable. Most supplements appear to be derived from plants (of which vegetables are just the tasty plants), and different plants are sources of some interesting bioactives
Does eating at night make it more likely to gain weight?
While the evidence is mixed, depending on who was studied and what the diets were, there does not seem to be a major inherent weight-gain effect when eating late at night. Individual results may vary, and other factors such as circadian rhythms should be considered as well.
Does aspartame increase appetite?
Do artificial sweeteners spike insulin?

References

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