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Wine

Wine is a fermented grape product, commonly ingested as a source of alcohol, that is seen as healthier due to its high stilbene and resveratrol content. There are a variety of other antioxidants in wine that can benefit health.

Our evidence-based analysis on wine features 9 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by .
Reviewed by
Examine.com Team
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Research Breakdown on Wine

Wine tends to contain the following, in varying dosages according to growing conditions and type of wine:

  • Resveratrol, a stilbene compound

  • Resveratrol oligomers (ε-viniferin, α-viniferin, sophostilbene A, rhaponticin, piceatannol).[2]

  • Alcohol

  • The amino acid proline[3] which acts with flavonol compounds to contribute bitter taste.[4]

  • Flavonol compounds like Quercetin, Kaempferol, Isorhamnetin, and Myricetin glycosides[5]

  • Anthocyanins (in red wines), up to 45 different combinations of glycosides[5]

  • Flavanals, including the four Green Tea Catechins and 4 other catechins.[5]

  • Cinnamic acids such as Fertaric acid, Ferulic acid and Chlorogenic acid[5]

  • Benzoic acids such as vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid (anthocyanin metabolite)[5]

  • Possible natamycin content, based on processing and usage to avoid Ochratoxin A contamination[6][7]

  • Melatonin from the grapes[8] as well as some serotonin[9] The metabolite of serotonin, 5-HIAA, and the precursor, tryptophan, also exist in grapes and wine.