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Turmeric

Turmeric is a spice commonly used in curry. It contains several bioactive compounds, notably curcumin.

Our evidence-based analysis on turmeric features 5 unique references to scientific papers.

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Research Breakdown on Turmeric


1Sources and Composition

1.1Sources

Turmeric is a spice that has traditional usage worldwide, but is mostly known to be used in Indian dishes where it is primarily associated with curry.

It has names such as Indian saffron (unrelated to crocus sativa, or true saffron).[1]

1.2Composition

Calorically, 100g Turmeric root contains:

  • 354kcal

  • 10g total fat (25% of calories) consisting of 3g saturated (7.6% total calories)

  • 38mg sodium

  • 2525mg potassium

  • 65g total carbohydrates; 21g of which are dietary fiber and 3g sugars

  • 8g total protein

Turmeric tends to have a 9% or greater moisture content

  • Curcuminoid compounds, including the prototypical Curcumin (5-6.6% dry weight) with Demethoxycurcumin, 5′-Methoxycurcumin, and Dihydrocurcumin[2][3]

  • Sequesterpenes germacrone, termerone, ar-(+)-, α- and β-termerones, β-bisabolene, a-curcumene, zingiberenel, β-sesquiphellanderene, bisacurone, curcumenone, dehydrocurdione, procurcumadiol, bis-acumol, curcumenol, isoprocurcumenol, epiprocurcumenol, procurcumenol, zedoaronediol, and curlone[4]

  • Volatile Oils (less than 3.5% dry weight) consisting of d-α-phellandrene, d-sabinene, cinol, borneol, zingiberene, and sesquiterpenes such as tumerones

  • (Rhizome) stigmasterole, β-sitosterole, cholesterole, and 2-hydroxymethyl anthraquinone

2Nutrient-Nutrient Interactions

2.1Iron

500mg of turmeric as a spice does not appear to interfere with iron absorption in young women.[5]