Turmeric

Turmeric is a spice commonly used in Curry, which has Curcumin and the Curcuminoids as the main bioactive compounds. Turmeric itself is fairly healthy and has other bioactives in it.

This page features 5 unique references to scientific papers.

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Scientific Research

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1Sources and Composition

1.1. Sources

Turmeric is a Spice that has traditional usage worldwide, but is mostly known to be used in Indian dishes where it is primarily associated with curry.

It has names such as Indian saffron (unrelated to crocus sativa, or true saffron).[1]

1.2. Composition

Calorically, 100g Turmeric root contains:

  • 354kcal

  • 10g total fat (25% of calories) consisting of 3g saturated (7.6% total calories)

  • 38mg sodium

  • 2525mg potassium

  • 65g total carbohydrates; 21g of which are dietary fiber and 3g sugars

  • 8g total protein

Turmeric tends to have a 9% or greater moisture content

  • Curcuminoid compounds, including the prototypical Curcumin (5-6.6% dry weight) with Demethoxycurcumin, 5′-Methoxycurcumin, and Dihydrocurcumin[2][3]

  • Sequesterpenes germacrone, termerone, ar-(+)-, α- and β-termerones, β-bisabolene, a-curcumene, zingiberenel, β-sesquiphellanderene, bisacurone, curcumenone, dehydrocurdione, procurcumadiol, bis-acumol, curcumenol, isoprocurcumenol, epiprocurcumenol, procurcumenol, zedoaronediol, and curlone[4]

  • Volatile Oils (less than 3.5% dry weight) consisting of d-α-phellandrene, d-sabinene, cinol, borneol, zingiberene, and sesquiterpenes such as tumerones

  • (Rhizome) stigmasterole, β-sitosterole, cholesterole, and 2-hydroxymethyl anthraquinone


2Nutrient-Nutrient Interactions

2.1. Iron

500mg of turmeric as a spice does not appear to interfere with iron absorption in young women.[5]

Scientific Support & Reference Citations

References

  1. Goel A, Aggarwal BB Curcumin, the golden spice from Indian saffron, is a chemosensitizer and radiosensitizer for tumors and chemoprotector and radioprotector for normal organs . Nutr Cancer. (2010)
  2. An unsymmetrical diarylheptanoid from Curcuma longa
  3. Masuda T, et al Chemical studies on antioxidant mechanism of curcuminoid: analysis of radical reaction products from curcumin . J Agric Food Chem. (1999)
  4. Structures of sesquiterpenes from Curcuma longa
  5. Tuntipopipat S, et al Chili, but not turmeric, inhibits iron absorption in young women from an iron-fortified composite meal . J Nutr. (2006)