Hibiscus rosasinensis

Hibiscus rosasinensis (China Rose) is a flower that has traditionally been used for hair growth and for the treatment of stomach ulcers. It has general antioxidant properties, but is otherwise underresearched.

This page features 6 unique references to scientific papers.

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1Sources and Composition

1.1. Sources

Hibiscus rosasinensis (of the family Malvaceae) is sometimes referred to as 'China Rose' and although it is mostly a decorative flower it appears to be used in hair growth and ulcer prevention.[1] In pakistani medicine, it is referred to as either Gurhal, Jasun, Ghorawal, or Badsha pasant where the root is used for cough and the flowers for aphrodisiac, emollient and emmenagogue.[2]

1.2. Composition

Hibiscus rosasinensis tends to contain:

  • Cyanidin and Cyanin glucoside[2]

  • Hibiscetin[2] and its glucoside Hibiscitrin[3]

  • Sabdaritrin and Gossypitrin[3]

  • Taraxeryl acetate[2]

  • β-sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and ergosterol[2]

  • Citric, Tataric, and Oxalic acids[2]

A preliminary screening has noted the presence of sterols, carbohydrates, glycosides, tannins and Flavonoids.[1]


2Interactions with Glucose Metabolism

Oral ingestion of Hibiscus rosasinensis at 250-500mg/kg in alloxan-induced diabetic rats noted that acute ingestion of this herb resulted in reduced blood glucose relative to control, and to a similar degree than the active control of glibenclamide (10m/kg).[4] Subchronic treatment over 7 days suggested that the 500mg/kg intake was similarly effective as 10mg/kg glibenclamide in these rats.[4]


3Interactions with Hormones

3.1. Testosterone

One study conducted in rats given various extracts of Hibiscus rosasinensis noted a general body weight gain and increases in the weight of the testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle which was weakest with a cold water extract and highest with an alcoholic extract.[5] The authors hinted at direct androgenic effects, and a possible phytoandrogen content.[5]


4Interactions with Organ Systems

4.1. Stomach

At 250-500mg/kg extract weight and in response to carbachol (a cholinergic agent that can induce gastric acid secretion[6]) China Rose was associated with less ulceration secondary to less acid secretion (dose-dependent, but to a small enough degree that both doses were similarly effect) which was thought to be due to anti-cholinergic effects.[1]

4.2. Intestines

China Rose has been found to have calcium channel antagonistic effects (via causing dose-dependent relaxation of potassium-induced contraction), and it showed dose-dependent spasmogenic effects between 1-10mg/mL yet the maximum effect (81.43 + 0.93%) was lower than that of acetylcholine; all of which were antagonized by M3 receptor antagonists (atropine).[2]

Scientific Support & Reference Citations

References

  1. Mandade RJ, et al Pharmacological effects of aqueous-ethanolic extract of Hibiscus rosasinensis on volume and acidity of stimulated gastric secretion . Asian Pac J Trop Med. (2011)
  2. Gilani AH, et al Presence of cholinergic and calcium channel blocking activities explains the traditional use of Hibiscus rosasinensis in constipation and diarrhoea . J Ethnopharmacol. (2005)
  3. Synthesis of Hibescetin
  4. Venkatesh S, Thilagavathi J, Shyam Sundar D Anti-diabetic activity of flowers of Hibiscus rosasinensis . Fitoterapia. (2008)
  5. Olagbende-Dada SO, Ezeobika EN, Duru FI Anabolic effect of Hibiscus rosasinensis Linn. leaf extracts in immature albino male rats . Nig Q J Hosp Med. (2007)
  6. Jan M, et al Comparison of verapamil and cimetidine for their effects on volume and acidity of Carbachol induced gastric secretion in fasting rabbits . J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. (2005)