Fat Loss

Purported to aid in reducing body fat mass; many tend to be stimulatory.

Our evidence-based analysis features 126 unique references to scientific papers.


Research analysis by and verified by the Examine.com Research Team. Last updated on Jul 13, 2018.

Goals

If you are looking for a list of supplements to take to help with fat loss, we recommend you look at our fat loss supplements.

The goal of any fat-burning compound is to increase the rate of fat loss. This can be achieved by either increasing the overall metabolic rate, the amount of calories that come from fat relative to other sources, or to raise limits placed on fat cells in regards to releasing fatty acids. Some newer fat burning compounds can also work via uncoupling, which is the process of creating heat inside of a cell.

Other compounds that augment the above reactions can be classified as fat burners.

Fat burners typically act directly on the fat cell, as is the case with yohimbine, or vicariously through some hormones like adrenaline (as is the case with caffeine).

If you are looking for a list of supplements to take to help with fat loss, we recommend you look at our fat loss supplement stack

Things to Know

Also Known As

fat burning, fat burner, fat burners

Caution Notice

Although not applicable to all, many fat burners increase levels of adrenaline in the body and should be approached with caution for those suffering from cardiac ailments or high blood pressure.

Many fat-burners are also neurologically active, and caution should be taken when one also uses neurologically active compounds like anti-depressants, be they prescription medication or supplemental.

Examine.com Medical Disclaimer

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions and answers regarding Fat Loss

Q: Does Garcinia Cambogia help with weight loss?

A: Garcinia Cambogia does not appear to help with weight loss in humans despite its popularity, and this is due to a profound difference in how it affects rats and humans.

Read full answer to "Does Garcinia Cambogia help with weight loss?"


Q: Can hypothyroidism lead to fat gain?

A: Yes, a less active thyroid will reduce metabolic rate and can cause some weight gain. It is not a lot of weight gain though, and a subactive thyroid is not an excuse for obesity (if hypothyroidic, please see a doctor for medication; it burns fat)

Read full answer to "Can hypothyroidism lead to fat gain?"


Q: How do I stay out of "starvation mode?"

A: Marasmus is a disease of caloric restriction, but you most likely don't have it. Your metabolic rate can definitely slow down during weight loss, but it will never slow to the point where it causes you to gain weight; in this sense, starvation mode is a myth.

Read full answer to "How do I stay out of "starvation mode?""


Q: Measuring body fat percentage: It's an accuracy thing

A: Comparing DEXA versus Bod Pod for people with different BMI.

Read full answer to "Measuring body fat percentage: It's an accuracy thing"


Q: Does eating at night make it more likely to gain weight?

A: While the evidence is mixed, depending on who was studied and what the diets were, there does not seem to be a major inherent weight-gain effect when eating late at night. Individual results may vary, and other factors such as circadian rhythms should be considered as well.

Read full answer to "Does eating at night make it more likely to gain weight?"


Q: Does diet soda inhibit fat loss?

A: It does not inhibit fat loss at all, and may actually suppress appetite that could help fat loss (although it does not induce fat loss per se either). Diet soda, in regards to body fat, is a carbonated inert beverage

Read full answer to "Does diet soda inhibit fat loss?"


Q: A compound from beer may help fat loss

A: A recent study shows that a compound in beer may help with fat loss.

Read full answer to "A compound from beer may help fat loss"


Q: Will carbs make me fat?

A: They can if you eat more calories than you should be eating, which is definitely a concern as carbohydrates are disconnected from the sensation of fullness in some people (preceding overeating). Inherently though, carbs do not cause more fat gain than the caloric load suggests

Read full answer to "Will carbs make me fat?"


Q: How do I get a six-pack?

A: You eat less food to reduce body fat. There will be abdominal muscles under the fat, and adding some muscle to this area (resistance training) can make them appear more aesthetic; fat loss is the main predictor, however

Read full answer to "How do I get a six-pack?"


Q: How does protein affect weight loss?

Read full answer to "How does protein affect weight loss?"


Q: What should I eat for weight loss?

A: When it comes to weight loss, the most important factor is eating less. When you consume less calories than you spend you will lose weight and the diet that helps you lose weight best will be the one that allows you to consume less calories without causing much distress or lethargy.

Read full answer to "What should I eat for weight loss?"


Q: Will lifting weights convert my fat into muscle?

Read full answer to "Will lifting weights convert my fat into muscle?"


Q: How do I lose fat around my belly?

Read full answer to "How do I lose fat around my belly?"


Q: Does high-protein intake help when dieting?

A: We analyze a study which suggests that a higher protein-intake while dieting can help you lose more fat.

Read full answer to "Does high-protein intake help when dieting?"


Q: How important is sleep?

A: Sleep is incredibly important, and can be considered crucial alongside diet and exercise. Proper sleep habits help sustain many biological processes, and bad sleep can cause these processes to be suboptimal or even malfunction.

Read full answer to "How important is sleep?"


Q: How to minimize fat gain during the holidays

A: Holiday season is when most people gain weight (and then struggle to take it off). Overfeeding on protein could be your solution in helping minimize the fat gain.

Read full answer to "How to minimize fat gain during the holidays"


Q: I have lost significant weight and now have loose skin. How can I tighten up my skin?

Read full answer to "I have lost significant weight and now have loose skin. How can I tighten up my skin?"


Examples (List)

Supplements that are primarily for Fat Loss

on Examine.com

Scientific Support & Reference Citations

Scientific support for each compound can be found vicariously through their respective pages.

Via HEM and FAQ:

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Cite this page

"Fat Loss," Examine.com, published on 15 November 2012, last updated on 13 July 2018, https://examine.com/supplements/fat-loss/