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Energy Drinks

Energy Drinks are drinks that are touted to give Energy, usually being a drink of caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone and B-complex vitamins with one or two random things thrown in to sound pretty and for marketability. They should be treated like a carbonated sum of the parts.

Our evidence-based analysis on energy drinks features 67 unique references to scientific papers.

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Summary of Energy Drinks

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Energy Drinks are a classification of drinks designed to provide acute neural benefits such as stimulation, focus, and anti-fatigue. Most energy drinks have caffeine as their primary ingredient.

'Energy Drinks' are fairly well studied as a combination of ingredients, and even more so as isolated ingredients. That being said, sometimes the combination of ingredients exerts different effects than isolated ingredients (when beneficial, it is known as 'synergism')

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Frequently Asked Questions and Articles on Energy Drinks

The (mild) health risks of energy drinks
Energy drinks can make a small, potentially negative impact in certain metabolic measures in young, relatively healthy people. But do these changes really matter?
Are energy drinks bad for you?
Case studies have linked energy drinks to adverse effects, especially on the cardiovascular system, but the overall risk of something bad happening is low and context-dependent.

Things to Note

Primary Function:

Also Known As

Redbull Energy Drink, Monster Energy Drink, Full Throttle Energy Drink, NOS Energy Drink

Do Not Confuse With

Caffeine (Main ingredient)

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Click here to see all 67 references.