Studies related to Weight and Ashwagandha

Naturopathic Care For Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial ISRCTN78958974

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 75
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64, 65+
Body Types Overweight
Notes for this study:
300 mg ashwagandha (1.5% withanolides) twice daily over the course of 8 weeks in persons with anxiety disorders also given counselling (placebo also given counselling) noted that supplementation was associated with a 56.5% reduction in anxiety symptoms as assessed by BAI while placebo only say a 30.5% reduction.

Exploratory Study To Evaluate Tolerability, Safety, And Activity Of Ashwagandha (Withania Somnifera) In Healthy Volunteers

Effect None
Trial Design Cohort
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 17
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29
Body Types Average
Notes for this study:
In an exploratory toxicological study in otherwise healthy persons, supplementation of a water extract at 750 mg for 10 days followed by 1,000 mg and 1,250 mg for 10 days each (equivalent to 6 g, 8g , and 10 g of the dry root) noted a 9.3% reduction in total cholesterol which was thought to be due to LDL cholesterol (trending to decrease) and a significant increase in strength in the quadricep and back extensor muscles (but not grip) was noted after 30 days despite no exercise.

Adjunctive Use Of A Standardized Extract Of Withania Somnifera (Ashwagandha) To Treat Symptom Exacerbation In Schizophrenia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

Effect None
Values (pounds). Mean + standard deviation. Placebo: before 191.33 (41.29), after 193.06 (41.33). Intervention: before 194.51 (49.57), after 197.00 (51.94)
Trial Design Randomized trial
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 68
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64, 65+
Body Types Obese, Overweight, Average, Underweight
Notes for this study:
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 64 schizophrenia patients were assigned to take placebo or 500 mg of an ashwagandha extract for the first week and 1000 mg for the remaining 11 weeks of the trial.

The primary outcome was the severity of schizophrenia systems as assessed by PANSS. Participants taking ashwagandha saw a modest, statistically significant reduction in their total symptoms compared with placebo. They also saw a notable reduction in perceived stress. Markers of inflammation, hsCRP, and S100B declined in the ashwagandha group and increased in the placebo group, but the difference wasn't statistically significant. There was no change in IL-6. There was no significant difference in blood pressure or body weight between the groups at the end of the trial.

No statistically significant differences in adverse events were found between the groups.
Funding issues for this study:
"This clinical trial was funded by the Stanley Medical Research Institute, Maryland, under grant award 12T-001. Natreon, Inc., New Jersey, provided the standardized extract of Withania somnifera and placebo."

"Dr Chengappa states that the University of Pittsburgh is pursuing intellectual property protection for the technology discussed in this article. Drs Brar and Gannon and Ms Schlicht have no conflicts of interest to disclose with regard to this study."

"Neither the Stanley Medical Research Institute nor Natreon, Inc. had any role in conducting the clinical trial, data gathering, or analyses or reporting of the study results."

Body Weight Management In Adults Under Chronic Stress Through Treatment With Ashwagandha Root Extract: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Effect Decrease
Values (kg). Placebo: before 77.16 (8.46), after 76.03 (7.72). Ashwagandha: before 76.35 (8.71), after 74.03 (7.29)
Trial Design Randomized trial
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 52
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64
Body Types Obese, Overweight
Notes for this study:
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 52 stressed, overweight/obese participants were assigned to take placebo or 600 mg of an ashwagandha extract containing 5% withanolides for 8 weeks.

The primary outcomes were ratings on the Perceived Stress Scale and the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait. Compared with the placebo group, the ashwagandha group saw a statistically significant reduction in stress and some but not most components of the food cravings questionnaire, though all components saw a reduction. The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire score revealed a small, statistically significant improvement compared with placebo.

Cortisol was statistically significantly reduced in the ashwagandha group and so was body weight and BMI.

Effects Of An Aqueous Extract Of Withania Somnifera On Strength Training Adaptations And Recovery: The STAR Trial

Effect None
Values (kg). Placebo: before 88.3 ± 14.4, after 87.7 ± 14.3. Ashwagandha: before 85.5 ± 10.5, after 84.9 ± 10.5
Trial Design Randomized trial
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 40
Gender Male
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64
Body Types Obese, Overweight, Average
Notes for this study:
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 40 healthy young, recreationally active men were allocated to take 500 mg of a potent ashwagandha extract (standardized to 10% withanolides) or placebo for 12 weeks.

The primary outcome was the change in muscle strength as measured by one-repetition maximum with the Smith machine bench press and back squat. There was a statistically significant increase in 1-repetition max for both squat and bench press. While the ashwagandha group saw a greater improvement in 7.5 km running down, this wasn't statistically significant between groups and the same was the case for average and peak power for squats and bench press, and number of repetitions.

There were no statistically significant changes between groups for body fat percentage, lean mass, fat mass, Android/Gynoid Ratio, visceral fat, or body mass. There were no statistically significant differences between groups on subjective assessments on a visual analog scale for perceived recovery, invigoration, mood, desire to work out, willingness to train, optimism, or soreness.

For blood testing, a large number of things were measured but none of it is particularly noteworthy (available in the values box in each respective outcome).
Funding issues for this study:
"Funding for this study was provided by Natreon, Inc. (New Brunswick, NJ, USA) through a restricted grant. The sponsor of the study was not involved in the conduct, interpretation, or the preparation of the final manuscript. A blinded third-party audited the collected data for accuracy and performed the statistical analyses."