Studies related to Lipid Peroxidation and Chromium

Influence Of Chromium-enriched Yeast On Blood Glucose And Insulin Variables, Blood Lipids, And Markers Of Oxidative Stress In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect None
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 36
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64, 65+
Body Types Obese
Notes for this study:
In obese type II diabetic (on medication) subjects given supplemental chromium via yeast (400 micrograms daily) for 12 weeks was associated with a decrease in blood glucose relative to placebo but all other measured biomarkers were unchanged, although a reduction in insulin and weight in both groups tended to decrease further with chromium.

Lipid peroxidation (MDA) was unaffected and the antioxidant enzymes were mostly unaffected, although a decrease in glutathoine and glutathione peroxidase seen at the end of the trial in placebo was mitigated with chromium.

Antioxidant Effects And Insulin Resistance Improvement Of Chromium Combined With Vitamin C And E Supplementation For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 6+ Months
Number of Subjects 30
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64
Body Types Overweight
Notes for this study:
In type II diabetics with an HbA1c over 8.5% given 1mg of chromium via yeast, supplementation was associated with a reduction in blood glucose (11%) and HbA1c (0.7%, from 10.2% to 9.5%) alongside an increase in insulin sensitivity.

Lipid peroxidation, as assessed by TBARS, was also reduced with chromium by 18.7%. An increase in glutathoine peroxidase was noted, but catalase and SOD were unaffected.

Potential Antioxidant Effects Of Zinc And Chromium Supplementation In People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 110
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64
Body Types Overweight
Notes for this study:
Supplementation of chromium (400μg as pidolate) in type II diabetics was able to reduce circulating TBARS level 13.6%, which was a potency comparable to 30mg zinc supplementation and the two were minimally additive; supplementation appeared to normalize 36-50% of the difference seen between diabetics (higher baseline TBARS than normal controls) and the normal controls, while antioxidant enzymes were unaffected.

HbA1c decreased nonsignificantly in all groups.

Antioxidant Effects Of Chromium Supplementation With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Euglycemic Subjects

Effect Increase
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 6+ Months
Number of Subjects 64
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64
Body Types Overweight, Average
Notes for this study:
Six months supplementation of 1,000mcg chromium to diabetic persons with varying HbA1c concentrations noted that diabetic persons with HbA1c above 6.8% experienced a decrease in TBARS (biomarker of lipid peroxidation) whereas those with less than 6.0% experienced a mild increase, although total antioxidant capacity was increased only in the severely diabetic (above 8.5%) with no influence in the lower glycation groups.

Antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, SOD, catalase) were unchanged in all groups.

Antioxidant Effects Of Chromium Supplementation With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Euglycemic Subjects

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 6+ Months
Number of Subjects 64
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64
Body Types Overweight, Average
Notes for this study:
Six months supplementation of 1,000mcg chromium to diabetic persons with varying HbA1c concentrations noted that diabetic persons with HbA1c above 6.8% experienced a decrease in TBARS (biomarker of lipid peroxidation) whereas those with less than 6.0% experienced a mild increase, although total antioxidant capacity was increased only in the severely diabetic (above 8.5%) with no influence in the lower glycation groups.

Antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, SOD, catalase) were unchanged in all groups.