Studies related to Abdominal Pain and Low-FODMAP Diet

Effect Of A Short-term Low Fermentable Oligiosaccharide, Disaccharide, Monosaccharide And Polyol (FODMAP) Diet On Exercise-related Gastrointestinal Symptoms

Effect Decrease
Values The individual symptom of pain was reduced in the low-FODMAP diet (p=0.031) and increased in the high-FODMAP diet (p=0.028), and both the change from baseline and endpoint scores were significantly different (4.13 ± 2.52 AU for low-FODMAP and 22.50 ± 6.35 AU for high-FODMAP, respectively, p = 0.003).
Trial Design Randomized trial
Trial Length 1-7 Days
Number of Subjects 19
Sex n/a
Age Range 30-44, 45-64
Body Types Trained
Notes for this study:
In this randomized controlled crossover trial, 16 healthy, recreationally-active runners were assigned to either a low-FODMAP or high-FODMAP diet for 7 days, followed by a one-week washout period before following the alternate diet for 7 days. The dietary interventions were intended to mimic free-living conditions, so participants chose foods from provided food lists to match their habitual energy intake and maintained their normal training routine.
At the end of each dietary period, participants rated their gastrointestinal symptoms with a modified IBS-SSS questionnaire and their perceived ability to exercise using a visual analog scale. Resting blood samples were collected at baseline and again after completion of both dietary interventions to measure I-FABP (a marker of acute gastrointestinal injury).

During the low-FODMAP diet, participants ate fewer carbohydrates compared to the high-FODMAP diet, but the amount was not different from their baseline intake. Mean IBS-SSS scores did not differ between diets, but a significant diet x time interaction was observed with post hoc analysis indicating a reduction in scores during the low-FODMAP diet. IBS-SSS scores increased with the high-FODMAP diet, but the change was not significant. End-point scores and the relative change in scores were significantly different, illustrating an improvement in symptoms during the low-FODMAP diet. The individual symptom of pain was reduced in the low-FODMAP diet and increased in the high-FODMAP diet, and both the change from baseline and endpoint scores were significantly different. The median differences in perceived exercise frequency and intensity were significant, with greater likelihood of improved scores in the low-FODMAP group. No significant interactions were observed for I-FABP.

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