Studies related to Blood Pressure and Hesperidin

Hesperidin Contributes To The Vascular Protective Effects Of Orange Juice: A Randomized Crossover Study In Healthy Volunteers

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 2-4 Weeks
Number of Subjects 24
Gender Male
Age Range 45-64
Body Types Overweight
Notes for this study:
In otherwise healthy overweight men, consumption of either orange juice or a control drink with pure hesperidin as a pill (with a third double-placebo group) noted that hesperidin at 292mg, relative to placebo over four weeks, was able to decrease diastolic blood pressure (3.2+/-1.5mmHg; 3.7%) with no influence on any other measured parameter except uric acid () and a trend to reduce sCAM-1 and increase nitric oxide.

There was no significant influence on basal microcirculation, but an increase was noted with both orange juice and hesperidin when measured acutely (6 hours after ingestion, near peak blood levels).

Citrus Polyphenol Hesperidin Stimulates Production Of Nitric Oxide In Endothelial Cells While Improving Endothelial Function And Reducing Inflammatory Markers In Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

Effect None
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 2-4 Weeks
Number of Subjects 24
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64
Body Types Obese
Notes for this study:
500mg of hesperidin daily for three weeks in persons with metabolic syndrome (in a double blind crossover study) was able to significantly improve blood flow as assessed by flow mediated vasodilation (24.5%) as well as inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (33%), serum amyloid A (23%), and E-selectin (13%) while there was no influence on blood pressure, VCAM-1, or ICAM and a minor decrease in Apolipoprotein B (2.3%) while the increase in insulin sensitivity measured at less than 1% as assessed by QUICKI failed to reach significance (P=0.06)

Hesperidin, A Major Flavonoid In Orange Juice, Might Not Affect Lipid Profile And Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

Effect None
Values WMD. SBP. −0.85 mmHg, 95% CI [−3.07, 1.36]. DBP−0.48 mmHg, 95% CI [−2.39, 1.42]
Trial Design Meta analysis
Trial Length n/a
Number of Subjects 577
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 18-29, 30-44, 45-64, 65+
Body Types Obese, Overweight, Average, Underweight
Notes for this study:
A meta-analysis of 10 randomized, controlled trials with a total of 577 participants included 8 studies that looked at LDL, 8 for HDL, 8 for total cholesterol, 8 for triglycerides, and 7 that looked at systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Of these, 6 had parallel designs and 4 were crossovers. It only considered studies that were more than 2 weeks in length and the studies ranged from 3 to 12 weeks.

5 studies were in healthy overweight/obese participants, 2 were in people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, one was in heart attack patients, and 2 were in patients with dyslipidemia. There were 2 studies that used high-hesperidin juices for the intervention group and low hesperidin juices for the controls, and one study used a high dose of hesperidin for the intervention group and a low (500 vs 100 mg) dose for the controls.

A random-effects model was used to calculate weighted mean differences and 95% CI. 5 studies were rated as "good quality", 3 as fair, and 2 as poor using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. There was no evidence of publication bias and the overall quality of the meta-analysis was rated 6.3 for lipid profile, 6.3 for systolic blood pressure, and 6.4 for diastolic blood pressure according to the Nutrigrade scoring system, suggesting moderate confidence for effects.

Overall, there were no notable or statistically significant changes in total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, or blood pressure compared with placebo. There was no significant heterogeneity for any outcome and the leave-one-out sensitivity analysis didn't alter any findings. A meta-regression was performed but didn't find evidence that intervention duration or dose was related to effects.