Studies related to Fatigue and Marijuana

Psychopathological And Cognitive Effects Of Therapeutic Cannabinoids In Multiple Sclerosis: A Double-blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study

Effect None
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 17
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64, 65+
Body Types Average
Notes for this study:
In a double-blind crossover study (one group participating as their own controls) where persons with multiple sclerosis used marijuana or placebo (sublingual application of both to a point where perceived muscular spasticity was reduced) noted that there were no differences between groups on cognitive tests or psychopathological scores.

Given tests were the PASAT (Paced Auditory Serial Additional Test) and MSFC (Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) with the former testing auditory information processing speed and calculation ability.

General symptoms of MS (fatigue, leg and arm function, quality of life, physical impairment) did not differ between study periods.

Cannabinoids In Multiple Sclerosis (CAMS) Study: Safety And Efficacy Data For 12 Months Follow Up

Effect Decrease
Trial Design Cohort
Trial Length 6+ Months
Number of Subjects 502
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64, 65+
Body Types Average
Notes for this study:
Following the completion of the CAMS trial and following up patients who chose to maintain THC / cannabis / placebo treatment for up to a year, it was noted that the benefits towards self-reported muscular health persisted while benefits appeared (to a clinically mild degree) on Ashworth rating scales. Fatigue and Energy, but not irritability or depression, also appeared to be benefited after 27 and 52 weeks.

Cannabinoids For Treatment Of Spasticity And Other Symptoms Related To Multiple Sclerosis (CAMS Study): Multicentre Randomised Placebo-controlled Trial

Effect None
Trial Design Double blind
Trial Length 1-6 months
Number of Subjects 630
Gender Both Genders
Age Range 45-64, 65+
Body Types Average
Notes for this study:
In persons with multiple sclerosis given either pure THC or cannabis extracts over 15 weeks, supplementation failed to result in any improvements in physician-assessed physical mobility although patient-reported stiffness, pain, spasticity, and spasms (but not shake/tremor) appeared to be improved with supplementation. This led to improvements in sleep quality, although symptoms of fatigue and depression were unaffected.