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A few pages have had preferential updates over the past month or so, and since they may not be the most popular supplements touting them here would be good to bring them to light.

  • Yamabushitake is a mushroom that is also known as Lion's Mane. It apparently has been used successfully for cognitive enhancement (or, to be more accurate, increasing cognition in a state of cognitive decline) and it seems to have a build-up effect like Bacopa monnieri. Could be a useful life-long supplement, and the 3g dosage could be acquired through foods (suggesting dietary changes rather than supplemental)

  • Coleus Forskholii, the plant of which Forskolin is the main ingredient, is pretty big now. Its an interesting compound in the sense that forskolin is potent and the mechanism it acts on does a wide-variety of effects. Its been implicated in causing fat loss and increasing testosterone, thus people are interested in its usage in sexification. There are some holes in the science though, particularily pharmacokineic data. An interesting research compound, but questionable long-term safety (specifically, its just not known)

  • Chlorogenic Acid is a compound that, in the past few weeks, has gotten a lot of search referrals for unknown reasons. It is a compound in coffee that contributes to some of the effects of coffee beyond just that of Caffeine. Its mostly a carb-blocker, but its metabolites caffeic acid and ferulic acid can interact with heart and brain health as well as reduce blood pressure in one human study.

  • Silk Amino Acids are a up-coming popular supplement that people suggest is a performance enhancer that really hasn't been shown to do anything in humans. The one rat study done looks very promising, but it appears to be going the way of D-Aspartic Acid where amazing claims are based off of one study. Too preliminary to do anything, but anecdotes suggest it makes your hair, nails and skin very silky and nice.


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