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Issue #22 (August 2016)

Letter from the Editor

Articles in this issue

  • Quoth the insulin hypothesis, “Nevermore”
    We previously covered the first highly-controlled trial on ketogenic diets and weight loss, and this is the much-anticipated and longer follow-up trial. Does the ketogenic diet truly provide a weight loss advantage?
  • Ask the researcher: Lalage Katunga, PhD
    Katunga researches oxidative stress, a topic that is central to pretty much every major chronic disease out there. She’s especially interested in oxidative stress and heart health.
  • Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: are diagnostic criteria around the corner?
    The last few years have seen much conflicting evidence on non-celiac gluten sensitivity. This study went deep into physiological responses to gluten, including immune responses and intestinal damage levels.
  • Might sucralose promote energy imbalance?
    Sucralose, commonly sold as Splenda™, has had a ton of safety research done on it. But there's a mechanism by which it could theoretically promote weight gain.
  • Cranberry juice for UTIs: natural remedy or old wives’ tale?
    A few trials have looked at this topic, but they've been fairly small. This large randomized trial looked at cranberry juice for women with recurrent UTIs.
  • Propionate – your ally against overeating?
    When you eat food, it results in a complex interplay between the food’s components, our gut microbiome, and our gut and brain’s response. It turns out that a type of fatty acid resulting from this process may help reduce appetite.
  • Just chill, so you can run faster
    Nobody likes overheating while exercising, but your muscles and brain especially don’t. This trial tested two cooling methods that may improve aerobic running performance.
  • Zinc carnosine: gut defender
    First of all - this isn’t plain old zinc, but zinc carnosine. Second, zinc carnosine is quite promising for gut health issues, and its impact on gut permeability was formally tested in this trial.
  • Is butter back? That depends on your viewpoint.
    It’s no longer considered obviously unhealthy to eat butter. But the question of butter’s impact on major health outcomes is still an open one, and one that this meta-analysis of nine studies and over 636,000 adults tried to answer.

Credits

Researchers

Alex Leaf, MS(c); Margaret Wertheim, MS, RD; Courtney Silverthorn, PhD; Zach Bohannan, M.S.; Jeff Rothschild, MSc, RD; Anders Nedergaard, PhD; Greg Palczewski, PhD(c); James Graham, PhD

Editors

Gregory Lopez, PharmD; Pablo Sanchez Soria, PhD; Kamal Patel, MBA, MPH, PhD(c)

Reviewers

Stephan Guyenet, PhD; Arya Sharma, PhD, MD; Natalie Muth, MD, MPH, RD; Sarah Ballantyne, PhD; Gillian Mandich, PhD(c); Mark Kern, PhD, RD; Katherine Rizzone, MD; Adel Moussa, PhD(c)

Infographics

Calla Lee

See all issues of NERD