The Nutrition Examination Research Digest (NERD) aims to provide rigorous, unbiased analysis of the latest and most important nutrition and supplementation studies. Click here to subscribe or login if already a subscriber .

In this article

Fattening up breakfast for weight loss

Calories are the most important weight loss factor, but not the only one. It turns out that the type of fats you eat may impact your appetite, and this trial tested two fats (CLA and MCT) for that purpose.

Study under review: Medium-chain triglycerides and conjugated linoleic acids in beverage form increase satiety and reduce food intake in humans

Introduction

Along the road to sustainable weight loss, the best of dietary intentions are often derailed by the reality of seemingly insurmountable, gut-wrenching hunger. While certain dietary modifications[1] can potentially increase satiety, such as increasing protein intake, other methods of reducing hunger are continuously being sought out.

Some research suggests swapping some vegetable oil for either natural trans-fat or coconut oil might help tame your growling stomach and aid in your weight-loss goals. There’s a chance this might be true.

Not all trans-fat are irrefutably unhealthy. The synthetically-made trans-fat found in fast-food french fries are known to be deleterious to health and have been banned from the U.S. food supply by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On the other hand, research on the health effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which is produced naturally in the digestive tract of ruminants like cattle, goat and buffalo (but also made synthetically), is still conflicting.

There are 28 different forms[2] of CLA, which as shown in Figure 1, all differ structurally from linoleic acid only in the position of their double bonds. The cis-9, trans-11 (9-CLA) and trans-10, cis-12 (10-CLA) variations are the most abundant and have recently garnered some attention for several potential health benefits, including the ability to increase satiety[3] and reduce body[4] fat[5] (primarily 10-CLA).

Figure 1: The structural difference between linoleic acid, 9-CLA, and 10-CLA

Similarly, the predominant saturated fats in coconut oil, known as medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), have also shown promise in reducing hunger[6] and body fat[7]. Some research has also found an association between MCT consumption and a reduction in food intake[8], whereas no human research has been conducted analyzing the effect of CLA on food intake within the same day.

Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to add to the recently growing scientific literature on the possible health benefits of CLA and MCT, by comparing the effects of CLA and MCT consumption at breakfast on satiety and food intake.

Some recent research seems to support the roles of MCT and CLA in promoting satiety, reducing food intake, and supporting weight loss. Adding to the growing literature, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of MCT and CLA consumption at breakfast on satiety and food intake.

Who and what was studied?

Become a subscriber to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to read the full article.

Becoming a member will keep you updated on the most important nutrition studies every month, and give you access to our back catalog of over 500 other articles.

NERD also includes access to Examine Personalized, which includes 150+ monthly summaries on the most important recent studies and access to our database of 10,000+ studies across 600+ health topics.

Stop wasting time and energy — we make it easy for you to stay on top of nutrition research

Try free for a week

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What were the findings?

Subscribe to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to unlock this article.

Free 7-day trial!

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What does the study really tell us?

Subscribe to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

The big picture

Subscribe to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

Frequently Asked Questions

Subscribe to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What I should know?

Subscribe to the Nutrition Examination Research Digest to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

Other Articles in Issue #20 (June 2016)

  • D-fending against dermatitis
    Atopic dermatitis, otherwise known as eczema, isn’t an easily treatable condition. This systematic review looked at whether vitamin D supplementation may help reduce the symptoms of atopic dermatitis
  • Interview: Rick Miller, MSc, RD
    Most cows provide milk that contains at least some of a protein called A1 betacasein. Rick explains the difference between A1 and A2 beta-casein, and what benefits may be associated with A2 milk.
  • Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be gluten intolerant
    We’ve previously covered peanut introduction in infants, and next up is gluten introduction. These researchers analyzed the changing literature looking at celiac disease risk when gluten is introduced at different times.
  • Do probiotics alter gut microbiome composition?
    Probiotic ads tout the number of live bacteria they contain, typically numbering in the billions. But our guts already contain trillions of bacteria. Do probiotics actually change the makeup of our microbiomes?
  • Dead, yet active probiotics?
    We know that the gut microbiome can play a major role in a variety of conditions, but the specifics are still being teased out. This study tested the effect of one particular strain called Pediococcus pentosaceus LP28, in a heatkilled formulation.
  • Carnosine for blood sugar control
    If you join together the amino acids l-histadine and beta-alanine, you get the dipeptide called carnosine. Carnosine may have a variety of benefits, and this trial tested carnosine’s specific effect on insulin dynamics.
  • Coenzyme Q10 and chronic fatigue syndrome
    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a life-changing condition without many effective treatments. Could daily supplementation with coenzyme Q10 be a simple way to improve symptoms?
  • Can arachidonic acid work as a bodybuilding supplement?
    There isn’t nearly as much research on potential benefits of omega-6 fatty acids as there is on omega-3s. This study looked at the effect of the omega-6 known as arachidonic acid on resistance exercise