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Issue #12 (October 2015)

Letter from the Editor

Articles in this issue

  • Eat less, live more
    Animal trials suggest that calorie restriction may extend lifespan. This is the longest human trial conducted thus far on the topic, and serves to inform calorie restriction’s health impacts and feasability.
  • Am I less hungry after I eats me spinach?
    The gut is a hot weight loss topic, even aside from the microbiome – some pharmaceutical drugs attempt to manipulate hormones or fat digestion in order to spur weight loss. What if an extract of spinach could also impact these factors?
  • Sugar Wars, Episode 2: “Fructose Strikes Back”
    Few food components have been demonized as much as fructose in the past decade. With fructose being presumed guilty in metabolic syndrome and heart disease, this systematic review sheds light on it’s actual impact on blood lipids.
  • The case of the misleading yohimbe labels
    What’s actually in a supplement bottle can be a mystery. These intrepid researchers investigated the actual contents of yohimbe bottles in order to see if this popular but possibly sometimes quasi-legal supplement is more (or less) than meets the eye.
  • Interview: Robert Krikorian Ph.D.
  • Paying attention to omega-3s for ADHD Open Access
    With more and more people being diagnosed with ADHD, there’s a continuing hunt for helpful treatments. Researchers tested an omega-3 supplement on young males, and also explored a potential dopamine-related mechanism.
  • Interview: Trevor Kashey, Ph.D.
  • From jelly to muscle: collagen and body composition
    Collagen has long been equated to junk protein, at least if you’re looking to gain muscle. Could it be underrated for this purpose? A trial of older men tested collagen protein to see if it could boost muscle gain and fat loss.
  • Throwdown, round 1: plant vs animal protein for metabolic syndrome
    The DASH diet is frequently tested in clinical trials, and often performs well. But the diet’s formulation includes strong limitations on red meat, which may be based on outdated evidence. This study compared animal-protein rich diets with a typical DASH diet.
  • Can omega-3s modulate the mind-muscle connection?
    While strength gains are usually associated with protein and muscle-related ergogenics, the nervous system isn’t targeted as often. This study explored a different type of omega-3 source (seal oil) for neuromuscular exercise effects.

Credits

Researchers

Alex Leaf, MS(c); Margaret Wertheim, MS, RD; Courtney Silverthorn, PhD; Zach Bohannan, M.S.; Jeff Rothschild, MSc, RD; Anders Nedergaard, PhD

Editors

Gregory Lopez, PharmD; Pablo Sanchez Soria, PhD; Kamal Patel, MBA, MPH, PhD(c)

Reviewers

Stephan Guyenet, PhD; Arya Sharma, PhD, MD; Natalie Muth, MD, MPH, RD; Sarah Ballantyne, PhD; Gillian Mandich, PhD(c); Mark Kern, PhD, RD; Katherine Rizzone, MD; Spencer Nadolsky, DO; Adel Moussa, PhD(c)

Infographics

Calla Lee

See all issues of Study Deep Dives