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Interview: Jasmina Aganovic

How much do you know about the bacteria that live on your skin? Whether or not you have skin issues, this interview is worth a look.

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Other Articles in Issue #25 (November 2016)

  • Skip breakfast, lose fat?
    The most popular type of intermittent fasting among people who lift weights seems to be a 16 hour fast, followed by an 8 hour eating window. This is the first trial to test that protocol in a trained population.
  • Milkshakes and insulin resistance: the perfect storm
    There's a lot to be learned about how insulin resistance develops. This highly controlled study tested a saturated fat binge, in order to isolate its effects on glucose levels and insulin resistance.
  • Starches last for better blood glucose
    Advice for blood sugar regulation ranges from "eat a balanced diet" to "beware carbs!". Macros and foods aside, could switching up the order in which you eat the same foods impact blood sugar?
  • A second look at protein quantity after exercise
    Do muscular people require more protein after lifting? How much protein is needed to optimize muscle protein synthesis after a workout? This trial addressed both questions.
  • New data on vitamin D safety
    Vitamin D supplementation would appear to have a pristine safety record, at least at first glance. This meta-analysis takes another look at that issue, specifically at potential effects on excessive calcium levels.
  • Can probiotics be used to treat multiple sclerosis?
    The main supplement that’s been linked to helping MS is vitamin D. This probiotic trial could help inform whether gut microbiome approaches should be equally emphasized.
  • Interview: Julianne Taylor
    Julianne is a New Zealand based nutritionist with a particular interest in autoimmune disease. Here, we pick her brain on what she’s found about the diet-disease connection. Julianne first trained as a registered general and obstetric nurse. She then retrained as a furniture designer, followed by a post-graduate diploma in design for disability in London. Back in NZ in the 1990’s Julianne designed, made, and fitted custom wheelchair seats and other aids for people with extreme physical disabilities.