Examine publishes rigorous, unbiased analysis of the latest and most important nutrition and supplementation studies each month, available to all Examine Members. Click here to learn more or log in.

In this article

Cutting through liver fat with citrus

Hesperidin, a compound found in the peels of citrus fruits, has shown promising results in rats for improving fatty liver. This trial put hesperidin to the test in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Study under review: Hesperidin improves hepatic steatosis, hepatic enzymes, and metabolic and inflammatory parameters in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

Introduction

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) impacts roughly one quarter[1] of the entire global population. NAFLD is a disease in which fat accumulates in the liver (greater than 5% of the weight of the liver) for reasons other than excessive alcohol consumption. NAFLD can be a serious issue since, as shown in Figure 1, fatty liver can ultimately cause liver damage and cirrhosis. While the condition has historically been seen primarily in adults, the rates of children with obesity in the U.S. are now roughly equal[2] to the rates of adults.

Hesperidin, a compound found in the peels of citrus fruits, depicted in Figure 2, has been investigated as a potential therapeutic option for NAFLD. Hesperidin is classified as a bioflavonoid glycoside (a type of polyphenol) and exhibits antioxidant[3] and blood lipid lowering[3] effects in humans. Additionally, previous investigations have shown that hesperidin can prevent[4] liver steatosis in rats. These data suggest that hesperidin may provide benefit for NAFLD, but until recently, this had never been tested in humans.

The present study was a randomized controlled trial studying the effects of hesperidin on hepatic steatosis as well as liver enzymes, metabolic parameters, and inflammation in individuals with NAFLD. > NAFLD affects one out of every four people. Hesperidin, a compound found in citrus peels, has been shown to have some properties that might benefit NAFLD. The present study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial studying the effects of hesperidin on hepatic steatosis as well as liver enzymes, metabolic parameters, and inflammation in individuals with NAFLD.

Who and what was studied?

Become an Examine Member to read the full article.

Becoming an Examine Member will keep you on the cutting edge of health research with access to in-depth analyses such as this article.

You also unlock a big picture view of 400+ supplements and 600+ health topics, as well as actionable study summaries delivered to you every month across 25 health categories.

Stop wasting time and energy — we make it easy for you to stay on top of nutrition research.

Try free for two weeks

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What were the findings?

Become an Examine Member to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What does this study really tell us?

Become an Examine Member to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

The big picture

Become an Examine Member to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

Frequently Asked Questions

Become an Examine Member to unlock this article.

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

What should I know?

Become an Examine Member to unlock this article.

Free 2-week trial »

Already a member? Please login to read this article.

Other Articles in Issue #61 (November 2019)