Hydration

Hydration is an approximately measurement of reserves of water on the human body, and a severe reduction in hydration from either no water intake or diuretic usage is known as dehydration. Some supplements are either diuretic or may promote water retention.

   

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In Progress

This page on Hydration is currently marked as in-progress. We are still compiling research.

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The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (excluding animal/petri-dish studies) to tell you what what supplements affect Hydration
GradeLevel of Evidence
ARobust research conducted with repeated double blind clinical trials
BMultiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
CSingle double blind study or multiple cohort studies
DUncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
SupplementChange
Magnitude of Effect Size
Scientific ConsensusComments
ACreatine
Comparative Health Goals evidence only available to buyers of our Supplement-Goals Reference

All information is still available and viewable on their respective supplement page.
CSodium Bicarbonate
CQuercetin
CTrimethylglycine
DRooibos

References

  1. Marnewick JL, et al. Effects of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) on oxidative stress and biochemical parameters in adults at risk for cardiovascular disease. J Ethnopharmacol. (2011)
  2. Persson IA, et al. Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers. Public Health Nutr. (2010)
  3. Utter AC, et al. Effects of rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage on blood and urinary measures of hydration after acute dehydration. Res Sports Med. (2010)

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