Cortisol

Cortisol is the hormone that mediates waking up and a variety of catabolic (tissue breakdown) reactions; it isn't bad in any way, but many people with elevated cortisol could suffer pathology from it. In these scenarios, it is nice to lower cortisol and supplementation may be effective.

This page features 19 unique references to scientific papers.

   
The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (excluding animal/petri-dish studies) to tell you what what supplements affect Cortisol
GradeLevel of Evidence
ARobust research conducted with repeated double blind clinical trials
BMultiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
CSingle double blind study or multiple cohort studies
DUncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
SupplementChange
Magnitude of Effect Size
Scientific ConsensusComments
BFish Oil
Comparative Health Goals evidence only available to buyers of our Supplement-Goals Reference

All information is still available and viewable on their respective supplement page.
BCaffeine
BDehydroepiandrosterone
BVitamin C
BPhosphatidylserine
BHMB
BCreatine
CYohimbine
CFenugreek
CMelatonin
CAlcohol
CBeta-Alanine
CNicotine
CMagnesium
C5-HTP
CTheaflavins
CEcdysteroids
CGamma Oryzanol
CLicorice
CMucuna pruriens
CSoy lecithin
CSchisandra chinensis
CSalvia sclarea
CRose Essential Oil
CGlutamine
CBranched Chain Amino Acids
CArachidonic acid
COrnithine
CArginine
CAshwagandha
CEurycoma Longifolia Jack
CGinkgo biloba
CGarlic
CTrimethylglycine
CSaffron
CVitamin E
CColostrum
CCocoa Extract
CAlanylglutamine
DLavender
DBoron
DBlueberry
DNigella sativa
DVitamin B6
DMarijuana
DVitamin B3

References

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