Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise refers to cardiovascular exercise that does not fall under the anaerobic exercise category, and can be conducted for a prolonged period of time. Supplements that improve endurance significantly can benefit aerobic performance.

   

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In Progress

This page on Aerobic Exercise is currently marked as in-progress. We are still compiling research.

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The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (excluding animal/petri-dish studies) to tell you what what supplements affect Aerobic Exercise
GradeLevel of Evidence
ARobust research conducted with repeated double blind clinical trials
BMultiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
CSingle double blind study or multiple cohort studies
DUncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
SupplementChange
Magnitude of Effect Size
Scientific ConsensusComments
BCreatine
Comparative Health Goals evidence only available to buyers of our Supplement-Goals Reference

All information is still available and viewable on their respective supplement page.
BL-Carnitine
BCaffeine
BVitamin C
BBranched Chain Amino Acids
BSodium Bicarbonate
BColostrum
CPyruvate
CNitrate
CCordyceps
CVelvet Antler
CKaempferia parviflora
CMagnesium
CCitrulline
CPelargonium sidoides
CAshwagandha
CAstaxanthin
CVitamin E
DBlueberry

References

  1. Del Bo C, et al. A single portion of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) improves protection against DNA damage but not vascular function in healthy male volunteers. Nutr Res. (2013)
  2. Wilms LC, et al. Impact of multiple genetic polymorphisms on effects of a 4-week blueberry juice intervention on ex vivo induced lymphocytic DNA damage in human volunteers. Carcinogenesis. (2007)
  3. Riso P, et al. Effect of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink intervention on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. Eur J Nutr. (2013)
  4. Krikorian R, et al. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults. J Agric Food Chem. (2010)
  5. Blacker BC, et al. Consumption of blueberries with a high-carbohydrate, low-fat breakfast decreases postprandial serum markers of oxidation. Br J Nutr. (2013)
  6. Clegg ME, et al. The addition of raspberries and blueberries to a starch-based food does not alter the glycaemic response. Br J Nutr. (2011)
  7. McAnulty LS, et al. Effect of blueberry ingestion on natural killer cell counts, oxidative stress, and inflammation prior to and after 2.5 h of running. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. (2011)
  8. Stull AJ, et al. Bioactives in blueberries improve insulin sensitivity in obese, insulin-resistant men and women. J Nutr. (2010)
  9. McLeay Y, et al. Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. (2012)
  10. Basu A, et al. Blueberries decrease cardiovascular risk factors in obese men and women with metabolic syndrome. J Nutr. (2010)
  11. Kay CD, Holub BJ. The effect of wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) consumption on postprandial serum antioxidant status in human subjects. Br J Nutr. (2002)

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