Today at Examine.com, we bring you a page on Origanum vulgare, also known as oregano.

Oregano is a popular spice and contains an oil component, which can be supplemented for an immune boost.

Research on oregano began in the 1980s. Its potent antioxidant and antibacterial properties lent themselves well to food preservation. Antioxidants are able to prevent the oxidation of fatty acids, which meant oregano could slow down the speed at which meat went bad and fruit browned. The antibacterial properties were also useful, particularly for storing meat.

It was hypothesized that these properties might extend to the human body as well, but there has been little research done on the matter. A single study on people using oil of oregano to ward off an intestinal infection was published in 2000. While the oil appeared to be very effective at eliminating the infection, the study was funded solely by a producer of oregano oil.

Further research is needed to determine if oregano’s effects really do apply to the human body.

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